Exploring the Factors Related to Cognition of Nurses in Disaster Nursing

Wednesday, 1 August 2012

Hung-Ju Tsai, RN, MBA
Lin-Lih Chuang, RN, MSN
Department of Nursing, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua City, Changhua County, Taiwan

Learning Objective 1: The learner will be able to concern the role of nurses and the demands placed on them in the disaster response program.

Learning Objective 2: The learner will be able to how to elevate our nursesí disaster response readiness, develop of training programs in disaster response.

Purpose:

     This study aims to assess the nurses’ understanding of the medical needs during a disaster as well as to recognizing what influencing factors exist. 

Methods:

       Subjects were nurses from a medical center in central Taiwan. A total of 170 nurses were enrolled working at emergency room, medical  and surgical critical units and wards. Purposive sampling was conducted during the month of May, 2011. Questionnaire was design after a thorough research of domestic and international literature and consulting with the experts, nurses with actual experience. The research scheme had to conform to the local conditions and research structure. The five main areas of focus in the questionnaire were the “competency of training demands ", " importance of training demands ", " importance of basic demands ", "domestic disaster support volunteerism" and "international disaster support volunteerism ". The Content validity index (CVI) of the questionnaire was .85. The internal consistency reliability, Cronbach ' s α, were range from .94- .97.

Results:

      The findings of this study are (1)The importance of training demands and international disaster support volunteerism were affected by nurses’ age and length of nursing practice. (2)Domestic and International disaster support volunteerism were influenced by the nurses’ marital status, education level, and working department. (3) Nurses who had taken special training in disaster preparedness courses such as Disaster Medical Assistance Team (DMAT) had shown a significant difference in their willingness to support either domestic or international missions.

Conclusion:

      The results of this research have lead to the comprehension of our nurses’ cognition concerning their role and the demands placed on them in the disaster response program. We also make recommendations to our policy makers as to how to elevate our nurses’ disaster response readiness, develop of training programs, and better performances during actual participation in disaster response.