Paper
Thursday, July 22, 2004
9:30 AM - 10:00 AM
Thursday, July 22, 2004
2:30 PM - 3:00 PM
This presentation is part of : Posters I
Outcome Measurement of Instillation of 0.45% Saline to Catheter Suction on Endotracheal Patients
Hsiu Yi Tseng, MSN, Nursing Department, Nursing Department, Tri - Service General hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

Nurses caring for endotracheally intubated patients commonly instill a bolus of normal saline into the endotracheal tube prior to suctioning. The rationale, when identified, is most often to lossen secretions or stimulates a cough. But there is lack of evidence that this practice is beneficial. The purpose of this study is to explore the effect of instill 0.45% normal saline or not into the endotracheal tube. Indicators used in the study included: 1)hemodynamic data ,2)PaO2 / FiO2, 3) SaO2 ,4) bacterial colonies. A quasi-experimental research design was employed for this study. During March 2002 to December 2002, total fifty-nine samples were selected from a 1200-beds teaching hospital ; twenty-eight patients were in the control group without 0.45% saline prior to suctioning and thirty-one patients were in the experimental group with 0.45% saline. Four instruments were used in this study : recording file, bedside monitor, gas analytic machine and bacterial colonies machine. Statistical methods including t-test, paired t-test, chi-square and GEE were used for data analysis. There was a significantly higher incidence of MBP, heart rate and bacterial colonies numbers in the experimental group. The PaO2 / FiO2 results of the control group were better than the experimental group. The SaO2 result just keep the significant increased within 3 minutes after suction, but the data recovery to the same degree as the data of pre-suction after 5 minutes and there░Žs no difference between two groups. These findings suggest nurses to consider what the most properly nursing care is for the endotracheal patients.

Back to Posters I
Back to 15th International Nursing Research Congress
Sigma Theta Tau International
July 22-24, 2004