Paper
Sunday, November 4, 2007

281
This presentation is part of : Adolescent Care Issues
Does Resilience Moderate the Associations between Parental Problem Drinking and Adolescents' Internalizing and Externalizing Behaviors?: A Study of Korean Adolescents
Hyun Hwa Lee, RN, MSN, School of Nursing, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA and James A. Cranford, PhD, Substance Abuse Research Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA.
Learning Objective #1: The learner will be able to understand that resilience moderates the associations between parental problem drinking and adolescentsí problem behaviors.
Learning Objective #2: The learner will be able to apply the concept of resilience into his/her intervention with children whose parents are problem drinker or alcohol dependent.

Background:  This study examined the main and interactive effects of parental problem drinking and resilience on externalizing and internalizing behaviors among Korean adolescents, a population that has received little attention in resilience research.

Methods: Data were collected from 482 adolescents (mean age= 14.4 years, 57% girls) from four middle schools in two urban areas in Korea

Results: Hierarchical multiple regression analyses show that parental problem drinking was directly associated with externalizing and internalizing behaviors. Further, the effects of parental problem drinking on both outcomes were moderated by resilience, such that the negative effects of parental problem drinking decreased in magnitude as resilience increased.  Simple slope analyses showed that (1) the effects of parental problem drinking on externalizing behaviors was significant only at low levels of resilience and (2) the effects of parental problem drinking on internalizing behaviors was significant at low and average levels of resilience.  

Conclusions: Resilience appears to protect against the adverse effects of parental problem drinking among Korean adolescents. These results have implications for prevention and intervention efforts aimed at Korean Children of Alcoholics (COAs) and highlight the importance of identifying dimensions of resilience that may be culture-specific.