Building Professional Confidence and Quality Competence

Tuesday, 19 November 2013: 10:00 AM

Milena P. Staykova, EdD, APRN, FNP-BC1
Mark A. Cromer, MS2
Deidira X Stewart, MSN, RN1
Jennifer R. Everidge, MS, RN3
Glenda K. Jones, MSN, RN4
Carol M. Bailey, MSN, RN5
Carolyn W. Lyon, MSN, RN5
Melody F. Sharp, DNP, RN5
Roxanne S. Wilson, BSN, RN2
Elliot D. Carhart Elliot, EdD,2
(1)Department of Nursing, Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke, VA
(2)Emergency Services, Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke, VA
(3)Department of Nursing, Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke,, VA
(4)Department of Nurisng, Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke, VA
(5)Nursing Department, Jefferson College of Health Sciences, Roanoke, VA

Learning Objective 1: To evaluate nursing undergraduate studentsí self-perception of the effects of an interprofessional (IP) learning activity on studentsí knowledge retention and ability to perform CPR/BLS.

Learning Objective 2: To enhance the readiness to enter the multidisciplinary-healthcare field

Abstract: New graduate nurses entering professional practice are expected to demonstrate basic proficiency during cardio pulmonary resuscitation (CPR)/Basic Life Support (BLS) events in community or clinical settings. Academic curriculum often doesn’t include CPR/BLS training leaving students to take courses through external providers which may become a challenge to building professional confidence and quality competence in diverse healthcare settings. Studies show that after initial certification, the retention of the CPR/BLS skills requires reinforcement; otherwise, a deterioration of skills is observed (Hamilton, 2005). Furthermore, in stressful situations healthcare professionals have deviated from standards or demonstrated lack of proficiency performing CPR/BLS (Martin, 2005). This study evaluated nursing and paramedic students’ self-perception of the effects of interprofessional (IP) simulation activities on students’ knowledge retention and ability to perform CPR/BLS. Method: This IRB approved descriptive study was based on triangulation including: interaction among students from two programs, individual observation by certified faculty of the implementation of the new 2011 AHA guidelines, and pre-and-post collaborative-activities survey. Sample: 36 nursing and 20 paramedic students. A survey, including a questionnaire and a 10-point visual analog response-scale, collected data. Results: The nursing students started with lower self-perception (µ=6.93, SD=2.40) compared to the paramedic students (µ=9.37, SD=0.96) whose curriculum included CPR/BLS training. After simulation activities, nursing students’ self-perception significantly increased (µ=8.90, SD=1.60) with a 1.97 difference. For the paramedic students, the self –perception showed only a slight increase (µ=9.74, SD=0.63) with a 0.37 difference. The t(35=1.2587E-55) for the nursing students with a p <0.01 led to rejection of the null hypothesis. Conclusions: The nursing students’ knowledge retention and ability to perform CPR/BLS increased after interprofessional learning activities as shown in the post-test. Nurse-education leadership should consider integration of simulation activities to bridge academic and practical competencies and increase nurses’ confidence in’ knowledge retention and ability to perform CPR/BLS.