Paper
Saturday, July 14, 2007
This presentation is part of : Nursing Administration and Leadership Issues
Against all odds: How do nurse supervisors in LTC environments manage to get through their day?
Katherine S. McGilton, RN, PhD1, Barbara J. Bowers, RN, PhD, FAAN2, Barbara McKenzie-Green, RN, Post, Grad, Dip, Couns, MHSc, (Hons), PhD(c)3, Maryanne Brown, RN, BScN, MSc1, and Veronique Boscart, RN, MScN, MEd, PhD(c)1. (1) Research, Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada, (2) School of Nursing, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, USA, (3) Faculty of Health Sciences, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia
Learning Objective #1: develop an understanding of the nature of the supervisorsí role in long-term care, as perceived by supervisors.
Learning Objective #2: discuss the implications of the complex role of the registered nurse supervisor in long-term care.

The importance of the role of the registered nurse supervisor in long-term care settings has been established.  However, there is an absence of research on the role and responsibilities of the registered nurse, or on how supervision is currently practiced in long-term care. The purpose of this study was to develop an understanding of the nature of the supervisors’ role in long-term care, as perceived by supervisors.  Data were collected from 16 supervisors in 8 selected Ontario facilities that varied in some characteristics that could influence the nature and enactment of the supervisor role (i.e. rural versus urban, large versus small, public versus privately owned). On average supervisors had worked in long-term care for 10 years and were 46 years of age.  All data was transcribed verbatim and a qualitative thematic analysis was conducted. Four categories reflecting the supervisors’ role in long-term care were derived: following through on routine tasks; being in the moment; filling in gaps of work not done; and supporting unregulated care workers through coaching and mentoring. We will present these findings and discuss the implications of the complex role of the registered nurse supervisor in long-term care, and their need to reprioritize moment to moment to get through their day.